Luwombo is one of the Ugandan cultural method of cooking introduced by Baganda clan in central region of Uganda. Baganda started using luwombo as their method of cooking way back in the late 1870's after Buganda separated from Bunyoro kitara empire.

It is a combination of a piece banana leaf and a fiber. Banana leaf is the main part of Oluwombo and its fiber is used to tie it to make oluwombo. Still in the luwombo, there is also a piece of banana leaf called akawuuwo which keeps the flavour in the sauce

When we talk of a delicacy the mind rushes to a thousand appealing images. with this "The western delicacy" however, i bring you one rare but delicious dishes known as KARO. Karo also Oburo as it pronounced in most western Uganda districts has over time earned the honour of presiding over cultural functions when it comes to meal time.

Be it weddings, introductions, thanksgiving ceremonies and other parties, people will not settle for less, at least you will hear a whisper or two "my lunch is never complete without Karo on such an occassion" while the other will check with the waiter "young man, how come you did not prepare Karo?" and so on.

Ugandan food is the arguably the best in Africa .
Only in Uganda will you find places that can give you variety of fresh food as compared to other countries, they include yummy banana dishes, stews, pastes and juicy fruits and drinks.

Uganda's culture weaves a yarn of variety not only through the manner of dress, language and other characteristics but also in its variety of dishes.

Nearly every tribe or region has a delicacy or specialty.
Most of the highly ranked hotels and restaurants serve traditional dishes in form of buffets but often come within a short distance of really preparing authentic traditional dishes.

The most popular local dish is matooke (bananas of the plantain type) which is best served with peanut sauce, fresh fish, meat or entrails. Matooke really goes with any relish.